Proposed Changes to Visa Character Test

Flag of New ZealandThe Coalition is being warned that a renewed push to tighten the character test for visa holders could see a fivefold increase in the number of people facing deportation, with residents from New Zealand and humanitarian refugees disproportionately affected.


The Coalition is being warned that a renewed push to tighten the character test for visa holders could see a fivefold increase in the number of people facing deportation, with residents from New Zealand and humanitarian refugees disproportionately affected.

The Morrison government has reintroduced a bill to change the Migration Act to provide grounds for visa cancellation or refusal where a non-citizen has been convicted of a serious crime punishable by two years imprisonment, even if a jail term is not imposed.

A submission from migration experts to the Senate committee examining the change warns the retrospective law could be the “largest expansion of the character test provisions in the Migration Act in history” and may result in the number of people who fail the character test automatically expanded “by a factor of five”.

“While difficult to compare, this may be one of the most significant retrospective applications of new legislation in recent parliamentary history, particularly for a bill with negative consequences for people,” the joint submission says.

“Given the retrospective application … there will likely be a step-change in the number and rate of visa cancellations and deportations from Australia.”

The signatories to the submission include immigration researcher and former Labor adviser Henry Sherrell, the former deputy secretary of the department of immigration Abul Rizvi, and academics Shanthi Robertson and Laurie Berg.

The fivefold increase has been calculated using figures from the Judicial Commission of NSW on the assumption that visa holders have a similar criminal profile to that of the general population.

Since changes to the character test were made by the Abbott government in December 2014, when Scott Morrison was immigration minister, the Coalition has cancelled a total of 4,150 visas, most of these being New Zealand citizens.

Between 2016 and 2018 Australia forcibly deported 1,023 people to New Zealand, sparking warnings from across the Tasman that the policy has had a “corrosive” effect on the bilateral relationship. Read more here

 

NZ Prime Minister with Australia Prime Minister
NZ Prime Minister Jacinta Ahern with Australia Prime Minister Scott Morrison

 

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