Community Conversations Report Launch

Community Conversations Report LaunchHealthWest Partnership, the Multicultural Centre for Women’s Health and the Centre for Multicultural Youth are pleased to invite you to the launch of the Community Conversations report on Tuesday 16 March. The report highlights the significant challenges faced by young people and women from migrant and refugee backgrounds when finding work.


The Community Conversations report highlights the significant challenges faced by young people and women from migrant and refugee backgrounds when finding work. Hear their recommendations for decision-makers about what needs to change to support economic inclusion for all. Join us when we launch the full report on Tuesday 16 March.

Event Details

Program: Community Conversations report
When: Tuesday, 16 Maruch 2021
Time: 11:00AM – 11:45AM AEDT
Location: Online
Register: https://www.jtproductions.com.au/community-conversations-reg

We talked to twenty young people and women from migrant and refugee backgrounds in Melbourne’s west.

THEY SHARED THEIR THOUGHTS AND IDEAS ABOUT:

1. What it means to have a job that they are happy with

2. The things that help or make it hard to get a job

3. What they would like to see done so there are more job opportunities

Almost everyone we talked to said communicating well in English was important in finding and keeping a job. This also included knowing how to communicate appropriately in specific Australian contexts.

Talking about finding work…

My English language and communication skills make it harder for me to find work. Not making more friends, developing relationships or getting involved in the community has made it challenging for me to find work. Language is the most significant barrier. Elaine

I have a Masters degree and the jobs that I apply to are relevant to my degree. I have the right experience and the right qualifications for the jobs I apply to, so I think the one thing that has definitely made finding a job most difficult is my abilities with English. Amanda

It is hard for me to find a job because although I can read, write and speak English, sometimes you have to formulate sentences like the locals do. Michelle

Talking about bad jobs…

Several people shared their experiences at work.

At the worst job that I’ve ever had, it was a very bad environment. I was working in a small office in a warehouse. My colleagues were always smoking in the warehouse and swearing a lot when speaking to each other. They were often racist and disrespectful towards me. The other employees working there were born in Australia but they were of migrant background. They know that I’m a migrant and would often make fun of my accent. This made me feel really bad. Amanda

Talking about unfair treatment & discrimination…

Almost all people we talked to shared stories of unfair treatment to themselves or others they know in the job searching process and the workplace.

The worst job that I’ve ever had was when I was working as a waitress. The owner had me come in for a trial. I didn’t enjoy the trial day and I called to let her know my reasons. Then she refused to pay me for the trial day. My English was really bad at the time so I couldn’t argue with her and stayed silent. Then she just hung up on me. I didn’t know that the law could protect me if she refused to pay me for my trial day. I didn’t report this incident because I didn’t know someone would listen to me. Ellen

When I first came to Australia, my English was only okay. My [employers] knew it was hard for me to find a job and that I needed the money… so they tried to rip me off and only paid me $6 per hour. They made me clean the whole shop and the toilets. Michelle

What decisions makers should know and do

Many people said decision makers need to better understand the specific experiences, challenges and barriers faced by people from migrant and refugee backgrounds.

Recognising migrants’ strengths

Some talked about the need to change the way migrants are seen.

People from migrant and refugee backgrounds who are highly educated, hold degrees and have a wealth of overseas experience. [Migrants] are rich in knowledge. Overseas degrees are not easy to get and these people work very hard. There are people who have suffered because of the economy or because of the war. There are people who have been traumatised by their experiences, but this doesn’t mean that they are victims. They are victorious. They took initiative in coming to a new country. Don’t underestimate the newly arrived. Laura

It’s really important for decision- makers to know that people from refugee backgrounds experience a lot of language barriers. They have to see the positive things that refugees bring too. For example, in my community, people are very compassionate and work very hard. Most people in my community working in aged care receive great feedback. Refugee people need more recognition for their strengths. People are not recognising others for their inner values. Tara

Acknowledge and address discrimination

Many of the young people and women spoke about the need to acknowledge discrimination and the need for change.

There is discrimination based on colour. There is a negative stigma around multicultural people. People assume you will rob them. So I would like them to know there is a discrimination. They need to change the way society views us. Elisabeth

The Community Conversations report highlights the significant challenges faced by young people and women from migrant and refugee backgrounds when finding work. Hear their recommendations for decision-makers about what needs to change to support economic inclusion for all. Join us when we launch the full report on Tuesday 16 March.

Event Details

Program: Community Conversations report
When: Tuesday, 16 Maruch 2021
Time: 11:00AM – 11:45AM AEDT
Location: Online
Register: https://www.jtproductions.com.au/community-conversations-reg

 

Community Conversations Report Launch

 


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